wednesday whammy

Lectures ALL day.

Morning started with 'Contemporary Media Industries.' We covered Simon Cowell and ITV again and how most hollywood films are a remake of past films which in turn were taken from someone else's idea.
This little video was quite entertaining.

<iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/19447662?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="400" height="225" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen allowFullScreen></iframe><p><a href="http://vimeo.com/19447662">Everything is a Remix Part 2</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/kirbyferguson">Kirby Ferguson</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

As some of us discussed later, we actually already knew that, but when you think about it in all it's glory it can be quite disturbing.

Nothing new under the sun.

With half an hour to spare we trooped over to Clarendon for our 'Making It In The Media' lecture. What did I learn? That there are far too many different types of producers in the world. Cannot be healthy.
Oh, but I always wanted to know who the Grip and the Gaffer were.

Now, who were they again...

Grip - any piece of equipment that holds the camera
Gaffer - lighting electrician

Tomorrow we have to get up and talk about a programme we've watched. Gulp.

At 13.15 Richard Klein, the controller of BBC 4, sat down with Tom Gutteridge and answered his questions. He talked about his life prior to BBC 4, working as a journalist and what he actually does in his job. Then Tom threw the questions to the floor. Richard was a great speaker and he had a lot of interesting insight.

I was a little disappointed that all the questions were either financial or political. Only one or two were about creative content and actual production.

I know we are supposed to understand 'the business', especially if we are going to work in it, but quite honestly I don't like it. I wanted to make programmes to tell the world a story, make people think.

Not to get ratings. Of course I want people to watch. But surely, surely there is some flaw in this ratings business. Richard said they don't base everything on ratings but that they were massively important. I don't believe you can continuously have ratings in mind and still always make great stories...