IP-UP-WeAllPP

I am currently sitting in my room, my little electric heater on full blast (which apparently costs me £1.74 a day) feeling miserable with the cold and editing my IPP showreel. 

The deadline for submission is looming and I need to get my act together. Firstly, know your enemy. Here are the IPP Module Handbook Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to demonstrate:

  • a professional understanding of the production process

  • a facility across a range of the concepts of production techniques

  • an ability to evaluate personal skills and production knowledge in a

    reflexive manner

  • Know, use and critically review the major production processes and

    technical applications of television and film production

  • Initiate, develop and realise distinctive and creative work within television

    and film production

  • Operate ethically in situations of varying complexity and predictability

    requiring the application of a wide range of techniques

  • Demonstrate competency in the skills of equipment handling, image and

    sound acquisition, post-production and delivery requirements on a variety

    of media platforms.

  • Can work productively in a team, showing abilities at different times to listen and contribute effectively within a production team.
I chose 'Director' as my specific role for the IPP Module. It is what I have always wanted to do and the longer I study the subject of filmmaking, the more I want to direct. 

My plan

The plan was to film one scene from a play and show that I can get a different performance of the same scene out of the actors. I wasn't going to focus on clever shots or elaborate sets. I was interested in the performance.

The Memory of Water is a play written by a woman whose name I cannot pronounce but it is perfect if you want to experiment with actors and especially if you are tired of an all male cast (which I am)

Filming these scenes was probably the least stress I've had in production and thinking back it's probably because 

a) the actors were very intuitive and easy to work with
b) they did not feel the need to exert their authority by constantly telling me how I should film.

Breath of fresh air.

The Production

We had a read-through rehearsal in the Stockton ARC cafe one evening and then about a week later we met at my house, trooped upstairs to my room and shot the scene, quietly and determinedly, in two different tones. It was a very simple establishing shot, single shot, single shot set up but it worked. I could have perhaps filmed a few cutaways but I didn't. I chose not to.

The Cut

What I am in the middle of looking at now are a couple of scenes, 2.15 minutes long, that create two totally different atmospheres. 

I'm looking at the learning outcomes and wondering whether I have met the criteria. 

Allow me to analyse:

"A professional understanding of the production process"

I cast actors. Planned a rehearsal. Found an appropriate location. Dressed the location. Arranged costumes. Decided on equipment and camera. Went as low budget as possible. This was all a process. The fact that I self-shot saved time, money and stress.

"A facility across a range of the concepts of production techniques"

If this sentence was in English perhaps I could answer it...

"An ability to evaluate personal skills and production knowledge in a
reflexive manner"

I am doing that now aren't I? I assume this is referring to the presentation we have to do after submitting our showreel. I know my skills and how deep my production knowledge goes. Reflecting on what I can and can't do is how I spend most of my life so it should be alright

"Know, use and critically review the major production processes and technical applications of television and film production"

I think we might be repeating ourselves here might we not, oh module handbook writer?
"Initiate, develop and realise distinctive and creative work within television and film production"

I believe I already have a certain style to my productions, which is distinctive. I think I could definitely develop the creativity of it more. In all fairness, I have picked a play to produce as a TV/Film medium which could be considered creative and distinct in itself. The character motivation I gave each actor was creative...in my humble opinion...
"Operate ethically in situations of varying complexity and predictability requiring the application of a wide range of techniques"

I suddenly realised that the wine could not actually be wine otherwise I would get my actor drunk without her consent which would have been unethical. So I changed wine into coke.

"Demonstrate competency in the skills of equipment handling, image and sound acquisition, post-production and delivery requirements on a variety of media platforms."

I framed the composition quite well, which I believe takes equipment handling. In that same vein of thought I used a tripod. I think I am a good editor and tend to edit on emotion and cut to the emphasis of the performance. I can export different formats. Is that what delivery requirements refers to?

"Can work productively in a team, showing abilities at different times to listen and contribute effectively within a production team."

This is where I may fall down since I did not have a cameraman, boom operator, producer etc., My team was my two actors, essentially. If we go on that basis then yes, I did work productively in a team. I listened to how they were responding to the script and contributed by guiding them when I felt they needed it. They in turn contributed to the production by questioning motivation and props and costume. Part of the reason I wanted these actors is because I know they add to the overall production.

That makes me feel better, I think I have covered as best I can